Brixham

Brixham is one of the busiest fishing ports in the UK and is home to some of the finest sea food you can think of, but it isn’t just about fishing. Brixham is also rife with art and culture and has several unique attractions suitable for the whole family.

Brixham is a great destination for art lovers, the town has a great range of art galleries that feature local artists as well as showcasing visiting installations. On the Strand, you’ll even have the opportunity to see artists working.

The town also boasts a museum and tours around the coast so you can get a real taste of it’s maritime heritage. Brixham is the home of the Golden Hind replica, a recreation of Sir Francis Drake’s flagship. Visitors can experience life on board and explore all five decks, it’s a great exhibition for kids learning about the Tudors or for adults who want to find out a bit more about the UK’s history.

Being a fishing port, you can expect a great choice of seafood restaurants with many independent, local establishments offering menus made from fresh local produce. It isn’t all fish though, Brixham’s restaurants and cafes are also supplied by an excellent selection of butchers and green grocers. You’ll be spoilt for choice!

Here are a few suggestions of places to see:

Berry Head

This national nature reserve is a piece of headland surrounded by water on three sides. It offers a lighthouse, a Napoleonic fort and stunning views of the sea. You can find out more about the history of Berry Head at the Visitor’s Centre and as an after walk treat you can visit the award winning Guardhouse Café.

There is disabled access and the area is dog-friendly.

St Mary’s Bay Beach

For those traveling with families and groups of people, St Mary’s Bay Beach is a great destination for those looking for more of a traditional beach setting. This exceptionally clean beach runs alongside a promenade which, in the summer, offers drinks and snacks. Children will enjoy taking a ride on the nearby narrow-gauge railway.

Dogs are not allowed on the beach from the 1st May to 30th September.

Greenway

Bought as a holiday home by Agatha Christie and her husband, Max Mallowan in 1938, this estate and garden has been described as ‘the loveliest place in the world’ by many. With an optional in-depth tour of the house itself and scenic walks around the grounds, this place is steeped in literary history and good old fashioned class.

Dogs are allowed on the grounds of Greenway. Parking must be pre-booked.

The Daymark

This  hollow, octagonal tower is built of limestone and rises to 80ft (24m) high on tall arched legs. It was built as a guide to mariners to the position of the harbour entrance. It is visible for many miles out to sea. Dartmouth harbour is notoriously difficult to find from the sea. In 1863, Charles Seale Hayne, the owner of Brownstone at that time, became a founder member of the Dartmouth Harbour Commission, whose main aim was to improve access and facilities to Dartmouth harbour. The following year, Seale Hayne leased land for the erection of this tower as a day beacon.

It can be reached from the South West Coastal Path just inland from Froward Point. Alternatively, park at Brownstone Car Park (grid ref SX904510). Then it’s a gentle walk along a tarmac drive through  farmland towards the sea. There are spectacular views across Start Bay and the Dart Estuary. Birds such as the cirl bunting, yellowhammer, skylark, buzzard and peregrine falcon can  be spotted. When you get a little closer you’ll find a short waymarked path across an arable field from the tarmac track to the Day Mark building.

As you walk down the track from the car park, the concrete surface, concrete posts and wire fencing serve as a clue to the activity that took place here during the Second World War. In the 1940s, the track provided access to the emergency coastal battery at Inner Froward Point, known as Brownstone Battery, where many of the original buildings can still be seen. The battery was built around 1942, when German U-boats posed a serious threat to shipping. The battery served to protect Dartmouth Harbour and the Slapton sands area from attack.

The Daymark

This  hollow, octagonal tower is built of limestone and rises to 80ft (24m) high on tall arched legs. It was built as a guide to mariners to the position of the harbour entrance. It is visible for many miles out to sea. Dartmouth harbour is notoriously difficult to find from the sea. In 1863, Charles Seale Hayne, the owner of Brownstone at that time, became a founder member of the Dartmouth Harbour Commission, whose main aim was to improve access and facilities to Dartmouth harbour. The following year, Seale Hayne leased land for the erection of this tower as a day beacon.

It can be reached from the South West Coastal Path just inland from Froward Point. Alternatively, park at Brownstone Car Park (grid ref SX904510). Then it’s a gentle walk along a tarmac drive through  farmland towards the sea. There are spectacular views across Start Bay and the Dart Estuary. Birds such as the cirl bunting, yellowhammer, skylark, buzzard and peregrine falcon can  be spotted. When you get a little closer you’ll find a short waymarked path across an arable field from the tarmac track to the Day Mark building.

As you walk down the track from the car park, the concrete surface, concrete posts and wire fencing serve as a clue to the activity that took place here during the Second World War. In the 1940s, the track provided access to the emergency coastal battery at Inner Froward Point, known as Brownstone Battery, where many of the original buildings can still be seen. The battery was built around 1942, when German U-boats posed a serious threat to shipping. The battery served to protect Dartmouth Harbour and the Slapton sands area from attack.